Greg Fallis

Reflections on the 13 pro-gun students who attended a gun rally in DC

In the wake of America’s school shootings, one endeavouring group of students marched on the capital in protest. But not in favour of what you’d think.

 

 

You guys, did you know gun rights are human rights? No? Well, the reason you don’t know that is on account of you weren’t one of the thousands hundreds dozens of people who showed up at the thirteen (13!) student-led “March 4 Our Rights” events recently.

You probably think the only student-led gun rallies are those led by gun-hating high school drama students with skinny arms or bald brown lesbian heads who want to take everybody’s guns, melt them down and turn them into dildos and instruments to be used in abortions. But no! Some students love guns. And they totally love the Second Amendment. Also, America.

March 4 Our Rights in Washington, DC. (Well, it was hot that day, and people were tired from staying up late and torturing pets by shooting fireworks on the 4th of July.)

The Chairwoman and National Director of “March 4 Our Rights”, Xena Amirani, said her movement is “organic, which is in stark differentiation with the marches held by Parkland gun control activists.” Organic, you guys! Like avocados. You can tell the movement is organic and totally trendy because just look at how they replaced “for” with the numeral 4, just like the cool kids do. And as everybody knows, all those anti-gun rallies and marches are phoney and paid for by the two Georges (Soros and Clooney) who want the American people disarmed in order to…you know, something.

Chairwoman Xena Amirani with organic flower.

Sadly for Amirani, her prediction that “thousands of students” would take part in the “March 4 Our Rights” was maybe a tad optimistic. Or delusional. Maybe three-dozen people attended the DC event. About 35 people showed up at the Chicago rally. And in Palm Beach, Florida there were only 13 (including the organiser, the three speakers, and the parents of the speakers).

The organiser of the Palm Beach rally said, “I don’t know why more people didn’t show up. I think a lot of conservatives are just afraid to show up for public events.”

I don’t know…maybe they wouldn’t be quite so afraid to show up for public events if there weren’t so many crazy fuckers running around Florida toting concealed firearms? Also maybe people didn’t show up because most folks think we don’t really need to keep arming those crazy fuckers. Just an opinion.

In case of domestic enemies. Or brown people. Or in case…what’s that guy got in his knapsack?

The problem, according to these students, is that their views are not being taken into consideration in the debate about school shootings. They just want to be heard. Instead, their call to “take back our gun rights” is met with a chorus of “What, are you fucking nuts? Take back your…just fuck off, okay?” Their complaints of “I’m being so discriminated against and my friends don’t want to spend time with me anymore just because I love America and guns more than I care about them getting all shot up probably by a mentally ill immigrant and stuff, it’s not fair” receive shockingly little sympathy. Their heartfelt plea to be part of the conversation is so often turned away by inconsiderate others who are unable to concentrate on the conversation because they don’t know who the fuck is carrying and what have you got in that backpack, anyway?

You see, gun rights advocates just want to start a dialog. Just a friendly dialog. A dialog in which they’re carrying a gun. Just in case you’re carrying a gun. A friendly dialog, so long as nobody makes an unexpected move. Or looks like they might make an unexpected move. Because c’mon, you can’t trust people; they might be some crazy fucker from Florida.

 

Greg Fallis

I’ve been around the block a couple of times. I’ve been a medic in the military, a counselor in the Psychiatric/Security unit of a prison for women, and a private investigator specializing in criminal defense. I’ve picked up a few degrees and taught various courses in criminology and sociology at The American University in Washington, D.C. and at Fordham University in New York City. Now I’m primarily a writer and photographer. I’m the managing editor of Utata.org–an international collective of photographers engaged in a variety of ongoing projects. I teach advanced workshops in Mystery Writing for the Gotham Writers’ Workshop. Like I said, I’ve been around the block a couple of times. It’s a good block; I expect I’ll keep going around it for a while.

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