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Leave the CV, a brain scan can get you a career

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In the not too distant future, brain scans will replace the need for a resume. Bad news for those who heavily pad theirs, which is to say, all of us.

 

 

Imagine a future, where part of the recruitment process is a brain scan, where a machine-learning system analyses your brain activity. Seems fairly intense, considering our archaic job interview process is already overwhelming enough.

Well, sadly, we’re already there.

Researchers from Harvard Medical School and other institutions across the US collectively assessed the bimanual motor skills of surgeons with optical neuroimaging. The researchers scanned the brains of the surgeons and were able to put them into two distinct categories – the surgeons who had to “think” about each task they were performing, and the surgeons who were more intuitive and experienced, who simply did it.

By researching the activity levels in both the motor cortex and prefrontal cortex, there is the unique ability to determine how best the individual will benefit from specific training.

 

Researchers and eventually bosses will have a better understanding around creating environments conducive to best outcomes for both workers and organisations.

 

Researchers had previously also conducted brain scans on pilots to determine how the brain works when a person is under stress, feeling fatigue or experiencing sensory overload. The researchers found the pilots made more mistakes when under stress, than in a flight simulator. Again, this research becomes less about suggesting a pilot shouldn’t fly under stressful scenarios, but rather leverages neuroscience to determine how activities, medications and even technology can help assist the process for the pilots in the real world.

Similarly, MRI scans have been used also to predict the intelligence of those being scanned, with the findings indicating that our brain activity is as unique as our fingerprints are.

By using neuroscience and technology to get a grasp on detecting better skill sets and how the brain reacts to differing scenarios, both researchers and eventually bosses will have a better understanding around creating environments conducive to best outcomes for both workers and organisations.

There is a danger of misuse. As you could easily create environments where brain scans are used to determine outputs, political abilities, physical abilities and other factors that can collectively influence a person’s job, hobby or their long-term goals. This is particularly problematic, as we barely know who we are, and indeed how much our brains evolve.

 

 

 

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